1. 2013 AARP LivePitch Judges Announced

    I know it’s been along time, tumblrs, but I’m getting back up on the horse.  Well, I intend to at least— and what says “I’m baaaack” like a release about our upcoming livepitch event? that’s right, nothing. 

    We piloted this concept of a hybrid investor/consumer pitch day back in september, in NOLA, and well, it was pretty cool. This go around will be bigger, better and… i’m pretty excited all around- I’m particularly excited about our judges this time (last judges were awesome as well, of course)— and we’ve locked Lisa again to emcee… and well, it’s vegas. right? vegas. 

    here’s a little sweetener: use the code “VIP50”    to get 50% off the registration…which is only 199 until 4/15— we have a discounted block of swankly rooms at the cosmo too. Yep, i just said “swanky”. 

     

      


    AARP Health Innovation@50+ LivePitch is pleased to announce its 2013 LivePitch Judges. 2nd annualAARP Health Innovation@50+ LivePitch, Friday, May 31 at the Las Vegas Convention Center is the premier showcase featuring the most exciting start-up companies in the “50 and over” health technology and innovation sector. The pitch event offers the venture capital and angel investor community as well as the media, the opportunity to connect with these outstanding start-ups. After the pitches, demos and questions from the judges, two grand prize winners will be selected at the end of the day: a Judges’ Winner and AARP Consumers’ Winner.

    Pitch Applications:  Companies have until April 12th to apply.
    Attendee Registration:  Registration is now open for investors and industry professionals who wish to attend.

    This year’s expert Judges include:

    Geoffrey Clapp, Health IT Entrepreneur / Advisor to Rock Health
    Brad Fluegel, Senior Vice President, Chief Strategy Officer, Walgreen Co.
    Alan E. Hall, Founder, Partner, Island Park Investments, Mercato, MarketStar, Grow America
    Nina Kjellson, General Partner, InterWest

    judges
          horiz-612

     
  2. top 10 reasons to attend AARP’s Health Innovation@50+ LivePitch

    Ok, so i didn’t come up with these, but I’m sure that letterman doesn’t write his lists either…. but i like’em:



    Online registration for our AARP Health Innovation@50+ LivePitch taking place Sept. 21 in New Orleans ends this Friday. You really need to be there.

    Top 10 reasons you need to be at AARP Health Innovation@50+ LivePitch

    1. Meet with and see the 10 finalists at the event
    2. Get to know many of the 70 companies that submitted to pitch but didn’t make it on stage.
    2. Network with profiled investors from across the United States.
    3. Interface with senior AARP executive management all in one place.
    4. Gain insight into “50 and older” market trends - the largest and fastest-growing consumer market!
    5. Connect with leading experts in the health tech marketplace.
    6. Tap into direct consumer insight from AARP Members as they provide feedback in the afternoon.
    7. Hear the State of the Union on the 50 Plus Tech Market and Where it is Going.
    8. Receive a free pass to 2012 Life@50+ AARP National Event & Expo.
    9. Enjoy the Big Easy. Cajun food. Jazz. French Quarter. and more…
    10. Get the edge on your competition.

    To register and attend as our complimentary guest please visit http://health50.org/register and use promo code: 910VIP
    Remember, registration closes this Friday.

     
  3. Summer Hiatus and Fall Preview

    Hey kids- sorry to go dark on you there-I took a little hiatus, the summer slow season and all, and have been preoccupied with some other things… It’s funny, I’ve been in the office the most consecutive days in a very long time, and oddly, I think I’m fairly caught up (shocker)-

    I won’t even try to go back to June and remember what happened, but I know there was something in NYC and then something else in Chicago, or something, I think Stephen from Aging2 was going to summarize those events…(ahem)

    It’s been a busy august, with internal planning for 2013 and contract work to lay out our activities for the fall-

    For those in the area, I’ll be in SF Monday and sadly only part of Tuesday for Rock Health’s Health Innovation Summit-Rock Health

    I’ve always enjoyed Rock Health’s events and have heard particularly good things about this one-I’m very much looking forward to it.

    September:

    I’ve very very very excited for our own AARP Health Innovation@50+ LivePitch event, taking place in conjunction with AARP’s annual Member Event and Expo “Life@50+”-in New Orleans on 9/21. I probably could have promoted the ‘call for applications’ a bit harder here, but through some incredible support from all the big players in the emerging consumer directed/oriented health tech industry, we had tremendous response (in my opinion)- and now with some other prelim judges the task of winnowing down all the applicants to the magic 8 begins. We’ve already had some very interesting and influentual people sign up to attend, so even if you didn’t have a chance to apply, and/or don’t make the cut (sorry-there can be only 1..err 8), I encourage you to come on down, hotel/airfare is actually rather reasonable (cough, hurricane season, cough) and to sweeten the deal use the promo code “JEFF50” and get half off the registration for the event. AARP Health Innovation@50+ LivePitch

    What makes this pitch day different, in my opinion, is that we are bringing in 50-100 AARP members to vote on 2 minute speed pitches from the companies, after the fancy pants VC’s judge them on their investment pitches. I am really looking forward to the juxtaposition of the two groups. As I said some great investors have already said they’re coming, so the networking for companies should be pretty good. and yes-like all good conferences, it ends with a reception, you think we wouldn’t booze you up before unleashing you on bourbon street?

    I’m also managing, (but not speaking on-so you can relax) two panels for the Life@50+ program on Saturday the 22nd. They’ll be pretty cool too.

    2 weeks or so later, (Oct 1-4) we’ll be back at DEMO to support 2 new companies that focus on or are owned by someone over 50, through our Innovation@50+ scholarship program. DEMO is always a great event- top notch production quality and they’re shacking some things up, so we’re really looking forward to a great event. I should have a friends and family discount soon-, so keep checking or watching on twitter. Demo: The Launchpad for Emerging Technology and Trends

    Sadly DEMO takes place at the same time as SOCAP and Intel’s Global Investment Conference (i was able to hit all 3 last fall…sigh) safe to say there is a lot going on.

    San Francisco

    -AARP is proud to sponsor Health 2.0’s main fall event on Oct 7th-10th, which as many of you know is something ofthe conference for new consumer health tech. Watch out for us on the Wifi towers. Sadly, I won’t be attending but look up Jody Holtzman and many others from AARP to chat.

    -CEA Industry Forum: Oct 14-17, Now if it were a different year, I think with this conference I would hit platinum, but again, I won’t be attending. The program looks great (as usual) and who doesn’t like SF in October?

    -We go a bit quiet after that (at least so far) but be looking for an announcement about mHealth summit in December, and as always, CES looms round the corner (did you get your room yet?)

    Let’s see if i actually report out on any of these conferences this time…!

     
  4. image: Download

    (photo credit-@MissVersitile) 

A couple of weeks ago (I know, I’ve been semi busy and semi lazy) I had the opportunity to be part of a panel at the Consumer Electronic Association’s ‘CE Week- Digital Downtown’ conference in NYC. It was a great, albeit short panel looking at tech and gadgets for the non geek set- a really great topic. 

I completely weaseled my way on to the thing- after I saw the title on the program. But given they had Parenting Magazine (representing both kids and Mommy’s (their term, I swear) and Lucky Magazine, representing (and i didn’t know this) 40 something tech savvy but non geeky style conscious people- of course we needed someone representing the older set- right? Right. 

I was thrilled when the conversation ‘naturally’ (ok i pushed this a bit on the prep call) toward taking age, and ‘geek level’ out of the conversation and focusing on design and function of devices. The essence of the conversation really was around the form and functionality of devices and services to meet the needs of different user bases- but the insight, or revelation if I can be dramatic, was better design will allow a product to be adopted more widely across multiple user bases. This isn’t a simple task-marketing for example is a tough nut to crack- as much as it would be nice for things to be ageless, that rarely creates the ‘sexy’ factor amongst what most manufacturers still consider their core demographic- those 18-34 yr olds. I do think there is a room to have a balance of sorts-or at least to create both product design as well as marketing campaigns that don’t alienate other markets out side of the geek/hipster set. It’s just not as easy.  Great conversation. I was also rather impressed at the turn out for what was essentially the last panel of the conference (with no reception afterwards to keep people around  either). 

In other news: If you’re around for Healthcare Unbound in SF on the 19th-21st, let me know. 

Then- I’m back in NYC on the 26th to speak at Aging 2.0’s next salon/meet up with Shesays. The mysterious Stephen Johnston tells me it’ll be at the Google NYC headquarters in Chelsea from 6-8, I’ll post more details as I get them. 

Finally July 30th I’ll be in Chicago for the InnovateLTC “LinkTank” competition.

Also be on the look out for some DEMO innovation Tour stops in August- Just a reminder- AARP is fronting the cost of Two companies to present at the Fall DEMOCON in October 1-3 in Santa Clara- apply now! (www.demo.com and select the AARP/Innovation50+ scholarship in the application).

    (photo credit-@MissVersitile)

    A couple of weeks ago (I know, I’ve been semi busy and semi lazy) I had the opportunity to be part of a panel at the Consumer Electronic Association’s ‘CE Week- Digital Downtown’ conference in NYC. It was a great, albeit short panel looking at tech and gadgets for the non geek set- a really great topic.

    I completely weaseled my way on to the thing- after I saw the title on the program. But given they had Parenting Magazine (representing both kids and Mommy’s (their term, I swear) and Lucky Magazine, representing (and i didn’t know this) 40 something tech savvy but non geeky style conscious people- of course we needed someone representing the older set- right? Right.

    I was thrilled when the conversation ‘naturally’ (ok i pushed this a bit on the prep call) toward taking age, and ‘geek level’ out of the conversation and focusing on design and function of devices. The essence of the conversation really was around the form and functionality of devices and services to meet the needs of different user bases- but the insight, or revelation if I can be dramatic, was better design will allow a product to be adopted more widely across multiple user bases. This isn’t a simple task-marketing for example is a tough nut to crack- as much as it would be nice for things to be ageless, that rarely creates the ‘sexy’ factor amongst what most manufacturers still consider their core demographic- those 18-34 yr olds. I do think there is a room to have a balance of sorts-or at least to create both product design as well as marketing campaigns that don’t alienate other markets out side of the geek/hipster set. It’s just not as easy. Great conversation. I was also rather impressed at the turn out for what was essentially the last panel of the conference (with no reception afterwards to keep people around either).

    In other news: If you’re around for Healthcare Unbound in SF on the 19th-21st, let me know.

    Then- I’m back in NYC on the 26th to speak at Aging 2.0’s next salon/meet up with Shesays. The mysterious Stephen Johnston tells me it’ll be at the Google NYC headquarters in Chelsea from 6-8, I’ll post more details as I get them.

    Finally July 30th I’ll be in Chicago for the InnovateLTC “LinkTank” competition.

    Also be on the look out for some DEMO innovation Tour stops in August- Just a reminder- AARP is fronting the cost of Two companies to present at the Fall DEMOCON in October 1-3 in Santa Clara- apply now! (www.demo.com and select the AARP/Innovation50+ scholarship in the application).

     
  5. An (in my opinion) incredible panel discussing the trends, facts, and opportunities surrounding what we call the “Longevity Economy”. Between you and me, this is perhaps the best discussion on this topic I’ve seen. (and i’m not just saying that because my boss was on it)

    Doug Busch, Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Intel-GE Care Innovations
    Ken Dychtwald, President and CEO, Age Wave
    Jody Holtzman, Senior Vice President, Thought Leadership, AARP

     
  6. Thoughts on DML 2012

    Last week, I attended the 2012 Digital Media & Learning Conference in San Francisco. “Learning?” I can hear you ask. Yes, Learning. 

    Ok, I was there because I was speaking on a panel on Design for All, Media, Learning and Multi-Generational audiences. I booked my travel well before the conference program was available, so I discovered that the main gist of the show was not, exactly, related to what I do on a day to day basis- but it was really fascinating, regardless.

    I was not super diligent at getting to every possible session, but those that I did attend were really interesting. What struck me, perhaps because I attending just a few days after HIMSS- were the similarities between what seemed to be a movement within the attendees of DML and the Health 2.0 movement, with some differences, of course.

    What was similar, to me as an outsider on both ‘movements’ is a change in the delivery of a set of activities (in these cases, learning and wellness (note I didn’t use Education and Healthcare)) that is facilitated by new technologies, where a passionate set of advocates are looking to radically improve the impact of the activities for a better outcome. Also related is the personalization of the activities, the empowerment of the individual on the ‘receiving’ end, and data- lots of data to measure outcomes.

    Ok, how could I not mention the gameification of everything, but frankly I’m so weary of that topic, I’d rather not discuss it. Either gameification is going to actually make us all be the people we should and want to be, or it’s not. I’ll just wait to see if it happens.

    In Health 2.0, it’s the devices of the quantified self, gathering all this crazy data that will be used to measure progress, micro course correct treatments and help us get to the best outcomes. In hmm, Ed 2.0 (I don’t know if that’s the right term) it’s new methods to use technology to, again capture micro moments of learning, which again, will be analyzed and materials will be tweaked to get to the the best learning outcome (at least I think that’s part of it). 

    Supporting, or perhaps surrounding both these movements seems to be a group of incredibly passionate smart people- trying to do the best they can for people that may not even know they need what is being created.

    I really never thought I’d see so many panels on data at Education conference (ok in full disclosure I didn’t go to any)- but i would have said the same thing about health tech, or digital health a year ago. the same questions of “now that we have all this information, what do we do with it and how do we present it” is happening in both groups.

    Maybe I’m just a super nerd, but I found all this really interesting.

    Oh, the panel I was on? Was very interesting as well-certainly different than any one I’ve been on in the past. Allison Druin described the differences in the ways that children use search, from as early as age 7- and the challenges that are presented by their behaviors. Cynthia Chiong of Sirius Thinking spoke about the differences between how parents and kids read/use ebooks and print books. I was expecting to see that all kids totally loved and were successful with the ebooks, it turns out it’s a lot more complicated than you’d think…

    Finally, Rafael “Tico” Ballagas from Nokia’s research and design group spoke about their work on co/distance reading platforms, which I’m a super fan of (not just because I’m away from my kids so much) the tech they’ve developed for storyvisit  is incredible- and the data they’ve found about interesting little elements (like is it invasive to have elmo there helping the story along? As it turns out, for grandparents…yes, yes he is!). I think the possibilities for combating isolation in elderly populations by connecting folks with either their grand kids or perhaps other kids that need some extra attention, through this sort of service is incredible.

    Where did Design for All come in to all this? Well I may not have done as good a job as I could have in making the pitch that DfA is a principle that should be foundational for all these sorts of studies. I do think, or hope at least, that I presented something of the demographic trends that make a case for considering the 50+ when designing products and services in general, and of course media, content, and learning. While i didn’t have much to say directly on the DML part- I find just giving some background on the segment usually triggers some thinking in the people in the room. My hope is just to be a little gnat in their ear saying “don’t forget the 50+”

    Based on some recommendations, I attended a panel on Saturday morning on Universal Design Learning (UDL). While focused on children, learning and disabilities- loved the concept of “variabilities”- essentially that even two people (kids, seniors whatever) diagnosed with the same issues or condition can have very different capabilities, how does one design learning (or devices) for all these variable? I actually don’t have the answer (surprise!) in the past I’d have argued that the best design picks a manageable common denominators of important features and uses creativity to bend the curve on those- an other argument could be to build in as much personalization and flexibility to accomplish as much for each person as possible (makes me think of all the ways to print a document in MS Word)- which is better?

    ….I’m not sure….

    What I love about ending up at conferences like this-where it’s a bit out of my wheelhouse, is the way makes me look at things from different perspectives…

    Which is always a good thing…